Latest Research

New research on diabetic foot disease is published on an almost daily basis. Keeping track of what is out there and finding the time to read seems a near impossible job at times. DFA aims to provide diabetic foot researchers with the infrastructure to accelerate high quality research, and to support health professionals to improve clinical outcomes. DFA will therefore provide you here with updates on the latest research on a regular basis.

70 results found

Summary:

  The new 2018 Australia guideline on footwear for people with diabetes has just been published in the Journal of Foot and Ankle Research. This new footwear guideline updates the 2013 Australian practical guideline on the provision of footwear for…

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  A number of studies have reported the rates and predictors for healing patients who present with a diabetic foot ulcer; combinations of infected and uninfected ulcers. Recently we summarised an Australian study that reported for the first time the…

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  A new Australian study from one of DFA’s favourite sons Dr Mal Fernando has completed his PhD that investigated the gait and plantar pressures of people with diabetic foot ulcers. We have showcased some of Mal’s previous studies on…

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Since the 1950s, when Dr Paul Brand observed that feet “heat up before they break down” into ulceration, we have known that temperature may be a marker for detecting impending foot ulceration. In the 2000s, a number of large trials…

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An enormous number of studies have investigated the risk factors for amputations in people with diabetes. Most risk factors found can be bundled into four groups, factors relating to: i) socio-demographic background (such as age or sex), ii) medical history…

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Clinicians treating foot ulcers are regularly faced with the decision of what to use on the wound if it has delayed healing. Recently, this decision has become more challenging with our new understandings on biofilm that further delays healing and…

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A number of previous studies have shown that indigenous Australians seem to have higher rates of diabetic foot complications than non-indigenous Australians. Arguably the most famous was a Medical Journal of Australia paper authored by Professor Paul Norman and colleagues…

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Summary:

  Non-removable knee-high offloading devices are the globally-recognised gold standard treatment to most effectively heal plantar diabetic foot ulcers. This is because they have been found to be the most effective in reducing plantar pressure and daily activity on the…

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