Tell us
what research would help diabetes

Feet!

blue square
blue square

Tell us what research would help diabetes

Feet!

So what's this all about?

Did you know that every two hours someone in Australia will under-go an amputation as a result of diabetes-related foot disease? Did you also know that diabetes-related foot ulcers are reported as the leading cause of amputation in Australia? For a little known disease, the statistics are confronting. But it does make you stop and think about the reasons why, and leads to one very important question. What can and should we do to end avoidable amputations within a generation?

To help tackle this important question, DFA in partnership with La Trobe University is building the "Australian Research Agenda for diabetes-related foot health and disease".  The study aims to determine what a broad range of people think are the most important questions about diabetes-related foot health and disease that should be answered by research. But to build it, we need your valuable thoughts and ideas.

So take a few minutes to think about the impact diabetes-related foot disease has in your personal and/or your professional life. What are your experiences? What do you think future research in Australia should focus on? Where do you think the gaps are? Wouldn't it be cool if...

 

La Trobe Ethics Approval

We're now collating all the 'Big Foot' questions from Round One!

The Round One survey has now closed and we'd like to say a big thank you for taking part and having your valued say in the future direction of diabetes-related foot disease research in Australia.

We've had a fantastic response to the Round One survey, and are now busy collating all the 'big foot' questions from the survey, before we release the Round Two survey in October to our Round One participants. So thank you all again as we work towards finding out the top 10 priority research questions for diabetes-related foot health and disease according to all Australian stakeholders.

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We've heard from those living with diabetes

Including people at risk of or living with diabetes-related foot disease and their carers.

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We've heard from Healthcare professionals

Involved in the care of people at risk of or with diabetes-related foot disease, across all healthcare sectors. 

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We've heard from Reseachers & Industry

Including researchers, academics, peak bodies and organisations involved with diabetes-related foot disease.

How does the survey work?

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Three
online surveys

It doesn't take much time to make a big difference.

We'd need you to participate in 3 surveys over a period of 3 months for around 30 minutes in total. The online surveys are anonymous, interactive, with the information provided then used to help us shape Australia's top 10 priority research questions in the field of diabetes-related foot health and disease. You can access the survey using your computer, tablet or phone! 

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We just need

0

minutes of your time to have your say in all three surveys
Round One V1

Survey has
closed!

Tell us the questions you'd like to see answered by research!

All questions are important, no questions are wrong, and questions can be as simple or complex as you'd like.

In Round One

We’d like to find out what’s important to you, based on your own experiences. This could include topics from living with, assessment, diagnosis, to treatment of diabetes-related foot disease. You can ask up to three questions you'd like answered by research. All questions are important, no questions are wrong, and questions can be as simple or complex as you'd like. It's completely up to you!

Round One V1

Survey has closed!

Tell us the questions you'd like to see answered by research

In Round One

We’d like to find out what’s important to you, based on your own experiences. This could include topics from living with, assessment, diagnosis, to treatment of diabetes-related foot disease. You can ask up to three questions you'd like answered by research.

Round 2 v1
COMING SOON

October Survey

Choose the questions that matter to you most

In Round Two

From survey one, we’ll then provide a full list of the ‘big’ questions found and then ask you to highlight what questions from the full list matter to you the most.

Round 2 v1
COMING SOON

October Survey

Choose the questions that matter to you most

In Round Two

From survey one, we’ll then provide a full list of the ‘big’ questions found and then ask you to highlight what questions from the full list matter to you the most.

Round 3

November Survey

Rank the questions to help build the national priorities

In Round Three

From survey two, we’ll then provide a list of top ten questions. All participants will then rank those top ten to help us determine the overall national diabetes-related foot disease research priorities.

Round 3

November Survey

Rank the questions to help build the national priorities

In Round Three

From survey two, we’ll then provide a list of top ten questions. All participants will then rank those top ten to help us determine the overall national diabetes-related foot disease research priorities.

Why is foot health research so important?

At the heart (or foot) of it, research aims to identify new treatments, prevention, and improve care. It can lead to new discoveries, development of new tools and procedures or highlight important trends and risks. Research can also help health care professionals to follow the most effective methods of care.

In Australia, a whopping $4 million is spent each and every day just managing diabetes-related foot disease. And when we look at the statistics below, it doesn't take much to see how quickly those costs could increase.

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Every day in Australia

0

MILLION is spent managing diabetes-related foot disease

0

Australians are living with a diabetes-related amputation

0

Australians are living with diabetes-related foot disease

0

Australians are at-risk of developing diabetes-related foot disease

Why is foot health research so important?

At the heart (or foot) of it, research aims to identify new treatments, prevention, and improve care. It can lead to new discoveries, development of new tools and procedures or highlight important trends and risks. Research can also help health care professionals to follow the most effective methods of care.

In Australia, a whopping $4 million is spent each and every day just managing diabetes-related foot disease. And when we look at the statistics below, it doesn't take much to see how quickly those costs could increase.

0

Australians are living with a diabetes-related amputation

0

Australians are living with diabetes-related foot disease

0

Australians are at-risk of developing diabetes-related foot disease
DFA_patientsicon_white_web
Every day in Australia

0

MILLION is spent managing diabetes-related foot disease

how much money is spent on foot research?

That's a good question.

Currently, diabetes-related foot disease receives less than 0.2% of Australian diabetes research. Between 2011-2015 research funding was less than $1 million. It certainly puts the $4 million spent each day managing diabetes-related foot disease into perspective.

This is where we need your help. We want to develop a national research agenda to identify what Australia's future research priorities should be in this area and improve national research funding for diabetes-related foot disease. .

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Diabetes related foot health receives less than

0%

of ALL Australian diabetes research funding
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"Little is known about what research priorities Australian stakeholders consider are important. This information is needed to plan how Australia can meet the challenge of ending avoidable amputations in the near future." 

how much money is spent on foot research?

That's a good question.

Currently, diabetes-related foot disease receives less than 0.2% of Australian diabetes research. Between 2011-2015 research funding was less than $1 million. It certainly puts the $4 million spent each day managing diabetes-related foot disease into perspective.

This is where we need your help. We want to develop a national research agenda to identify what Australia's future research priorities should be in this area and improve national research funding for diabetes-related foot disease. 

.

research-512 (1)
Diabetes related foot health receives less than

0%

of ALL Australian diabetes research funding
DFA_patients group

"Little is known about what research priorities Australian stakeholders consider are important. This information is needed to plan how Australia can meet the challenge of ending avoidable amputations in the near future." 

so how does research help?

Check out some diabetes-related foot disease research from all around Australia that highlights just a small sample of the impact foot research can make.

This huge study – led by Dr Yuqi Zhang from Queensland University of Technology analysed an enormous amount of data from the "Global burden of disease study" to estimate the diabetic foot prevalence and disability burden numbers for 200 countries, 20 regions, 20 age groups and one planet.

An excellent new Australian study led by Dr Angela Searle and Prof Viv Chuter from the University of Newcastle has reported that calf muscle stretching alone in people with diabetes does not increase their ankle range of motion nor reduce their forefoot plantar pressures.

This new Aussie research led by Dr Emma Macdonald and Dr Byron Perrin from La Trobe University performed focus groups and surveys on 53 diabetes patients and is one of the first studies to explore our patient’s barriers and enablers to using new smart insole technology.

This large review led by University of Tasmania’s Pam Chen – President of the Advanced Practicing Podiatrists-High Risk Foot investigated through a systematic review and meta-analysis, if health literacy is associated with diabetic foot disease, its risk factors, or foot care.

Joint Australian research led by Prof Viv Chuter's Uni of Newcastle team and Prof Stephen Twigg's Uni of Sydney team found people with neuropathy perform less exercise and walking than those without. Plus, those with foot ulcer history sit more than those without.

An Australian study led by Dr Rob Commons and Dr Ed Raby surveyed Infectious Diseases Consultants from right around Australia and New Zealand has found that diabetes-related foot infections (DFI) make up 20% of all their work and are managed very differently between consultants.

A new systematic review has found multiple studies have implemented indigenous diabetic foot health programs, but very few have evaluated their clinical outcomes. Prof Viv Chuter’s busy team reviewed 13 studies: 5 implementing podiatry services and 8 education programs.

University of Wollongong researchers investigated the health-related quality of life among adults living with diabetic foot ulcers, & found those with diabetic foot ulcers have poor overall quality of life which was worse in those with larger ulcers, ulcers for longer, and ulcers complicated by ischaemia or infection

A new Australian study led by Dr Alex Barwick from Southern Cross University and Dr Pete Lazzarini from QUT found 49% of people with diabetes and 43% with peripheral neuropathy mostly wore outdoor footwear in the past year that did not meet DFA Footwear guideline recommendations for DFU prevention.

What happens with the results?

We will let you know about the results throughout the study. During Rounds 2 and 3, broad results will be made available as this helps the decision-making process during Rounds 2 and 3. At the completion of the study, a report will be written by Diabetic Foot Australia describing the results and will be published on our website. A peer-reviewed journal article will also be completed describing the results.

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Identify Research
Priorities

We can identify the agreed priority research questions on diabetes-related foot disease according to all stakeholders that need to be answered to help end avoidable amputations.

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Assist
Researchers

It can assist researchers to develop important and clinically relevant future research that should have relevance and impact in Australia.

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Focus on Foot funding

Provide the data to immediately recognise the priorities and give a greater focus on improving the current 0.2% allocated within the diabetes funding allocation.

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So...
What BIG FOOT questions would
you like to see
answered by

Research?

Square Orange 2
So...
What BIG FOOT
questions would
you like to see
answered by

Research?

FAQ's

The study aims to determine what a broad range of people think are the most important questions about diabetes-related foot health and disease that should be answered by research. The study is led by Diabetic Foot Australia (DFA), the peak body related to diabetes-related foot disease in Australia in partnership with La Trobe University. 

Any person with experience in the field of diabetes-related foot health and disease is invited to participate. This includes people living with diabetes, a carer of a person with diabetes, health professionals involved in the care of people with diabetes and foot problem, and researchers, industry representatives and government agencies. All participants must reside in Australia and being part of the study is voluntary. 

If you want to take part in this study, we will ask you to complete 3 surveys over 3 months.

  • In Round 1 you will be asked to nominate three research questions related to diabetes-related foot health and disease that they think should be answered by research.
  • In Round 2 you will be asked to select your top 10 research questions from the list of questions suggested by all the participants following Round 1. The top 10 questions for the whole group, and from each group of participants who identify themselves as living with diabetes, health professionals, researchers or from industry will be determined for Round 3.
  • In Round 3 you will be asked to rank a final set of 10 questions in order from 1 (highest priority) to 10 (lowest priority) for the whole group, and also the sub-group that you identified with.

The Round One survey will be open throughout the month of August for four weeks, with the Round Two and Round Three surveys to follow in October and November 2020.  We do need participants for all three rounds, so make sure to join during the Round One survey in August to avoid missing out.

If you no longer want to complete the questionnaire, simply close the web browser. If you change your mind after clicking on the ‘Submit’ button, please email to request the withdrawal of information:  [email protected]

If you would like to speak to us about the study, please use the contact details below:
Name: Dr Byron Perrin
Organisation: La Trobe University
Position: Head of Department, Rural Department of Community Health
Telephone: 03 9479 1443
Email: [email protected]

Yes!  We're publicising this study though our website and social media, and have asked relevant organisations to promote the project. Word-of mouth promotion is also encouraged.

Just remember we need participants who meet the following criteria:  

  • Reside in Australia 
  • People living with diabetes, a carer of a person with diabetes, health professionals involved in the care of people with diabetes and foot problem, and researchers, industry representatives and government agencies.

The personal information you provide will be handled in accordance with applicable privacy laws, any health information collected will be handled in accordance with the Health Records Act 2001 (Vic). Subject to any exceptions in relevant laws, you have the right to access and correct your personal information by contacting the research team.

Click on the Participant Information Statement below to read more. This project also has Ethics Approval from La Trobe University: HEC20282.

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This research is supported by Diabetic Foot Australia and Latrobe University with Ethics Approval - HEC20282